COVID bonus goes to Perrysburg Twp. employees

LIME CITY — Perrysburg Township Trustees expressed their gratitude to employees who worked through the COVID pandemic with a $1,000 bonus.

Trustee Bob Mack announced the extra pay for 56 township employees at a recent meeting.

“What it really comes down to at our township is the people and our team that make a difference,” he said. “While other governments, it seemed, were trying to find out ways to maybe not go to work, or do things like that, our employees in our maintenance department, and our first responders, and our emergency and police personnel, they were always on the job.

“So we are extending a $1,000 bonus for 56 employees, who remained employees throughout COVID and loyally reported to the workplace, for work, throughout the pandemic.”

They will be using some of their unspent Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funds for the bonus.

All three trustees confirmed the formal motion “of gratitude,” giving the bonus.

The bonus doesn’t apply to some employees, like new hires and employees who left, possibly for new jobs, during that time period.

Fire Chief Tom Brice and Police Chief Mark Hetrick thanked the employees.

“I just want to thank the board and the administrators for their efforts in this. I think it’s well deserved,” Brice said. “I remember the team here that I dealt with … going into home after home with COVID, and maybe not completely understanding what COVID meant, and to the police officers who stayed outside, but when we needed them, they came right in, with no hesitation.”

He also thanked the maintenance people, who he credited with their willingness to get in the vehicles and keep them in good repair.

Brice pointed out that in November 2020 the fire department had at least 50% of their staff down.

“Most importantly, my guys and gals stood ready to help the citizens of Perrysburg Township and the surrounding communities, really without any regard for their own safety,” Brice added. “A lot of them worked a lot of consecutive hours.”

He also thanked the trustees for always backing the emergency personnel, especially in granting requested supplies and equipment. He also thanked the local citizens and businesses for helping with personal protection equipment and supplies with their many donations.

In other business, the meeting began as an organizational meeting with trustees selecting Joe Schaller as the chair and Gary Britten as vice chair.

In departmental business:

The maintenance department is doing curbside pickup of Christmas trees on Jan. 9.

Director Marvin Conner noted that the township turns the trees into wood chips that are taken every year by a resident.

Appreciation was given by trustees and department heads to Administrator Walt Celley, who retired.

In his final official action during a meeting, Celley received approval for the Enterprise Master Equity Lease Agreement, which will formally start the new township vehicle leasing program.

Det.-Sgt. Scott Moskowitz spearheaded that program. He said it was impossible to know how much would ultimately be saved, but gave an example of what the fire department would save this year.

“It depends on what we replace and what we get to replace them, but I know, when we did the (Fire Department) analysis that what we are replacing will be about $130,000 in savings,” Moskowitz said.

Recreation and Recycling Department Director Bob Warnimont said the township has received a grant through the Wood County Park District for a new single bay swing that will go into Starbright Park for $4,662. The cost will be reimbursed to the township after installation.

There were also complaints about recycling litter on Lime City Road related to the township recycling bins.

Warnimont asked citizens to utilize all the recycling bins and not overfill them.

Township employees worked to clean up recycling that was stacked outside of bins. The first one in the row had filled and people stacked recycling outside the bin, instead of checking the ones further in line. Also, material sticking out of the bins ends up on the roof of the recycling truck and ends up blowing off the vehicle onto and along the street.