BGHS tax request needs to be scaled back

To the Editor:

Bowling Green City Schools voters were not given the option to support a more affordable high school renovation with new additions.

We can have what our students need at less taxpayer expense. Why vote for the maximum tax and indebtedness?

The responsibility for decades of neglected school buildings lie with past as well as the present school board we elected. All of our school buildings are located on spacious lands but are in dire physical conditions. Why? Building failures have become obvious over the years to people who visit the sites. A clear explanation is required from those we elected to serve in the students best interest.

High inflation rates keep increasing, currently at 8.3%. This is not the time to ask residents for the astronomically high millions in debt this board wants to build a new high school now, plus build at inflationary costs.

The state checkbook has been in place for years; BGCS does not participate.

What is our best fiscal decision at this time? What can residential taxpayers afford in an inflationary period?

Before voting, check the tax estimator on the Wood County auditor’s website for total additional tax burdens.

Sue Smith

Bowling Green

(Editor’s note: The BGCS treasurer confirmed that the district does not participate in Ohio Checkbook. Based on information from the Secretary of State’s Office, there are only 170 schools in Ohio out of 612 that do participate. The finance/audit committee reviewed information from the secretary of state’s office and information from other local entities who have ceased participation in the program at a September committee meeting. It was decided that the Ohio Checkbook only provides a snip of information and can easily be misunderstood if taken out of context. The committee decided that we have been transparent, and will continue to be, by providing requested information and utilizing the tools that are currently in place. There was a committee consensus that in its current form, the Ohio Checkbook could not benefit us beyond what we are currently doing at this time. There is no law in place that requires public entities to participate in the Ohio Checkbook.)