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Construction firms worried about worker shortage PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 15:09

DENVER (AP) — The construction industry says it's in danger of not having enough people to keep up with demand for building projects, as workers age and more teens are pushed to go to college.

That worry comes after 2 million construction workers were laid off during the recession.

One trade group, the Associated General Contractors of America, announced a plan in Denver on Tuesday to draw more people into building trades. That plan included establishing charter schools focused on technical training, starting non-union apprenticeship programs and pushing for immigration reform.

The group believes many of the laid off workers have since found work in other fields or retired.

Denver was picked for the announcement because it has been one of the top 10 metro areas for adding new construction jobs in the past year.


Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 
FDA: Honey with any added sweeteners isn't honey PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by MARY CLARE JALONICK   
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 13:12

The Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to ensure that shoppers who buy honey are getting the real deal.

New guidance issued Tuesday would prevent food companies from adding sugar or other sweeteners to pure honey and still calling it "honey."

The agency said enforcement action is possible against U.S. food businesses or importers if companies try to cut those sweeteners into real honey and do not label the product correctly. If those sweeteners are added, the label should read "blend of sugar and honey" or "blend of honey and corn syrup."

The FDA regularly detains honey imports and tests them after finding drug residues and unlabeled added sweeteners.


Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 
U.S. bacon prices rise after virus kills baby pigs PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by M.L. JOHNSON, Associated Press   
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 13:49

MILWAUKEE (AP) — A virus never before seen in the U.S. has killed millions of baby pigs in less than a year, and with little known about how it spreads or how to stop it, it's threatening pork production and pushing up prices by 10 percent or more.

Estimates vary, but one economist believes case data indicate more than 6 million piglets in 27 states have died since porcine epidemic diarrhea showed up in the U.S. last May. A more conservative estimate from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows the nation's pig herd has shrunk at least 3 percent to about 63 million pigs since the disease appeared.

Scientists think the virus, which does not infect humans or other animals, came from China, but they don't know how it got into the country. The federal government is looking into how such viruses might spread, while the pork industry, wary of future outbreaks, has committed $1.7 million to research the disease.

The U.S. is both a top producer and exporter of pork, but production could decline about 7 percent this year compared to last — the biggest drop in more than 30 years, according to a recent report from Rabobank, which focuses on the food, beverage and agribusiness industries.

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Scant relief: Summer gas price to dip 1 cent PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by JONATHAN FAHEY, AP Energy Writer   
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 13:05

NEW YORK (AP) — Drivers will get the slightest of breaks on gasoline prices this summer, according to the Energy Department.

The national average price is forecast to fall — by just one cent — to $3.57 per gallon between April and September, the months when Americans do most of their driving.

Still, that would be the lowest average since 2010. For the year, the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration expects gasoline to average $3.45 per gallon, down from $3.51 last year and also the lowest since 2010.

World demand for oil is growing, but supplies are growing faster, thanks to higher production in North and South America. The price of Brent crude, a benchmark used to price oil used by many U.S. refineries, is forecast to fall 4 percent this year.


Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 
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