AP News


Wet weather delays planting for Ohio farmers PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 09 May 2014 19:43
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A cold, wet spring has delayed planting for some Ohio farmers, but they’re not worried yet.
The same thing happened last year, and it turned out to be a great season for crops.
Through last Sunday, only 8 percent of the corn had been planted in Ohio, down from the five-year average of 25 percent at that point, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Only 3 percent of soybeans had been planted, below the five-year average of 12 percent.
Joe Cornely, spokesman for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, told The Columbus Dispatch that “farmers are anxious, but they are far from panicking.”
“Farmers will tell you that the earlier start you get to the cropping season, the better,” Cornely said.
He said the rule of thumb is that farmers like to have corn planted by mid-May, followed quickly by beans.
David Black, who farms 2,400 acres in central Ohio, said he got a slow start last year, too, and it turned out OK.
“We’ve got plenty of time,” he said. “Last year, we planted until the middle of May, corn and beans, and we had fantastic crops.”
Planting at the optimum time is important to producing a robust crop. If the weather stays warm and dry, as it has been this week, farmers can make up for lost time quickly with today’s powerful farming equipment and technology, experts say.
With good conditions, farmers might be able to get as much as half of the state’s corn crop planted in a week or so, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension corn specialist.
As is often the case in Ohio, conditions vary considerably across the state.
 
Judge orders Indiana to recognize gay couple's marriage PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, 08 May 2014 13:00
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A lesbian couple seeking to have Indiana recognize their out-of-state marriage on the terminally ill partner’s death certificate has more time to fight their case after a federal judge granted a preliminary injunction requiring the state to do so.
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Gay Arab-Americans find comunity in NYC PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by By SALIM ESSAID / Associated Press   
Wednesday, 07 May 2014 09:43
NEW YORK (AP) — With a loud hiccup and a hand over her mouth in coy embarrassment, Madame Tayoush mimics Lebanese diva Sabah in her performance of the sultry classic “Atshana” — or “I’m Thirsty” — as Arab-Americans hoot and cheer. The burst of a trumpet vibrato sends her into a dramatic swoon, basking under applause and the warmth of stage lights.
The low neckline of her halter gown exposes a hairy chest.
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Muddy water in obstacle courses can make you sick PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by The Associated Press   
Friday, 02 May 2014 20:11
LAS VEGAS (AP) — It turns out the toughest obstacle of a Tough Mudder-style race might not be dodging live electrical wires, hoisting logs or leaping over a wall of flames. It might be the nasty stomach bug that can come from swallowing the muddy water.
The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a memo Friday warning that animal feces in the mud along the courses can give participants a bad case of diarrhea. The agency said nearly two dozen people from the Nellis Air Force Base community in Nevada reported coming down sick after participating in a race in rural Beatty, Nevada, in October 2012.
The investigation traced the sickness to the bacteria campylobacter coli. It concluded people became ill after accidentally swallowing contaminated water on the course, which was on a cattle ranch within sight of cows and pigs. The sickness generally sets in three days after the race, and it lasts a week.
Adventure races are increasingly popular in the U.S., where they drew about 1.5 million participants in 2012, according to the CDC memo. In the 10- to 12-mile-long Tough Mudder challenges, participants slither on their bellies through fields of mud, plunge into icy water and try to cross lakes while balancing on slippery tightropes.
The contests often draw active-duty military personnel or civilians in top shape. But the CDC said those daredevils can be brought to their knees by the stomach bug, which lurks in the animal droppings on the man-made mud fields.
Health officials recommend race organizers warn participants about the gastrointestinal dangers of the contest, and stress the importance of hand-washing and avoiding swallowing the water. They also recommend race organizers set up the courses in areas where animals are less likely to roam.
Officials with Tough Mudder didn’t immediately respond to a message seeking comment Friday morning, and it was unclear whether the organization planned to change any policies in response to the CDC’s findings.
The CDC noted the bacteria causing sickness after races has hit sports events in the past. Campylobacter outbreaks after several bicycle races in Europe were traced to bike tires splashing up dirty water into participants’ mouths.
LAS VEGAS — It turns out the toughest obstacle of a Tough Mudder-style race might not be dodging live electrical wires, hoisting logs or leaping over a wall of flames. It might be the nasty stomach bug that can come from swallowing the muddy water.
The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a memo Friday warning that animal feces in the mud along the courses can give participants a bad case of diarrhea. The agency said nearly two dozen people from the Nellis Air Force Base community in Nevada reported coming down sick after participating in a race in rural Beatty, Nevada, in October 2012.
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MERS virus confirmed in an American PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by The Associated Press   
Friday, 02 May 2014 20:07
NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials on Friday confirmed the first case of an American infected with a mysterious virus that has sickened hundreds in the Middle East.
The man fell ill after flying to the U.S. late last week from Saudi Arabia where he was a health care worker.
He is hospitalized in good condition in northwest Indiana with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Indiana health officials, who are investigating the case.
The virus is not highly contagious and this case “represents a very low risk to the broader, general public,” Dr. Anne Schuchat told reporters during a CDC briefing.
The federal agency plans to track down passengers he may have been in close contact with during his travels.
So far, it is not known how he was infected, Schuchat said.
Saudi Arabia has been at the center of a Middle East outbreak of MERS that began two years ago. The virus has spread among health care workers, most notably at four facilities in that county last spring.
Officials didn’t provide details about the American’s job in Saudi Arabia or whether he treated MERS patients.
Overall, at least 400 people have had the respiratory illness, and more than 100 people have died. All had ties to the Middle East region or to people who traveled there.
Experts said it was just a matter of time before MERS showed up in the U.S., as it has in Europe and Asia.
“Given the interconnectedness of our world, there’s no such thing as ‘it stays over there and it can’t come here,”’ said Dr. W. Ian Lipkin, a Columbia University MERS expert.
MERS belongs to the coronavirus family that includes the common cold and SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which caused some 800 deaths globally in 2003.
NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials on Friday confirmed the first case of an American infected with a mysterious virus that has sickened hundreds in the Middle East.
The man fell ill after flying to the U.S. late last week from Saudi Arabia where he was a health care worker.
He is hospitalized in good condition in northwest Indiana with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Indiana health officials, who are investigating the case.
The virus is not highly contagious and this case “represents a very low risk to the broader, general public,” Dr. Anne Schuchat told reporters during a CDC briefing.
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