Glass recycling ended earlier this summer at the Bowling Green Recycling Center, but Mayor Richard Edwards said the city is still working on a way to recycle the material.

"We are all too painfully aware that a resolution has not been found for the glass recycling issue," Edwards said during Monday's council meeting. "However, we continue to be optimistic and we may even have a workable plan this week."

The recycling center stopped taking glass on July 12. The director of the center, Bill DenBesten, told the Wood County commissioners last month that glass is heavy to transport and almost not worth the cost of 30 cents per ton, per mile. A news release noted that the center's main glass purchaser decided to stop recycling the material, and other options were too far away and expensive.

"It's been kind of frustrating not to find a good spot for it," Edwards said at Monday's council meeting. "There's a real interest in (recycling glass) ... To me, I think that's really kind of neat, people are interested in recycling. ... We've gotten the attention of one huge player" in the glass market, which he did not name.

Earlier in the meeting, Edwards said, "We've had continuing discussions and I think you might be guessing, there's a very large (interest) in this particular county in glass because of a world headquarters I will not name in Perrysburg, Perrysburg Township. This is something that has captured a lot of interest, again, and (we're) wanting to make sure that we stay in the glass recycling business."

Edwards said that Wood County Commissioner Doris Herringshaw and County Administrator Andrew Kalmar have made efforts on the city's behalf regarding the issue.

In other business, council heard from Utilities Director Brian O'Connell that the city's reservoir at the water treatment plant near the Maumee River has had "non-detect" levels of microcystin, a harmful toxin produced by algae.

He said typically they detect some of the toxin in the reservoir by this time of the year.

O'Connell said the department is using a new aeration system at the reservoir which disturbs algae, so they're not able to become comfortable enough in their environment to reproduce. The department is are also applying algicide that targets harmful algal blooms.

"So far we think we're seeing some good results and we're hopeful those will continue," he said. "We're trying to do things we can to combat it on the front end before it gets to the plant."

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