Woman who assaulted developmentally disabled teen applies for judicial release

A former Bowling Green woman sent to prison for assaulting a developmentally disabled teen has applied for judicial release.

Kendall Jackson, 25, appeared Monday in the courtroom of Wood County Common Pleas Judge Molly Mack.

Mack said she would take the request under advisement and issue her decision within 10 days.

Jackson pleaded guilty in November 2019 to eight assault charges, two counts of endangering children and one count of patient abuse.

The charges occurred after video showed her abusing a 14-year-old boy with developmental disabilities on Feb. 4, 2019. The boy resided in a group home.

Jackson, at that time, was an employee at the facility and was assigned to the night shift. Her duties involved caring for the teen.

“Over several hours, Jackson hit, punched, slapped and threw him down on the bed causing him to be seen wincing and crying on the video. She later laid on top of him while punching him,” said Pamela Gross, Wood County chief prosecuting attorney, during the plea hearing.

Mack, in January 2020, imposed a prison sentence of four years and 11 months.

Jackson filed for judicial release in July and wrote in the request that she “fell into a state of self-absorbing behavior that harmed and devastated many people that I cared about.

“While being incarcerated I have learned how to be patient and to think before I react.”

On Monday, defense attorney Sara Roller said, if released, Jackson would live with her father in Oak Park, Michigan.

He was in the courtroom Monday. Also attending the hearing was the victim’s mother. Neither parent spoke during the proceedings.

Roller said her client planned to find employment and seek mental health counseling upon her release.

“She wants to get her life back on track,” Roller said.

Jackson has completed programming while in prison and is on a waitlist for several others. She works third shift as a laundry aide.

Gross said part of the plea agreement was the potential for judicial release after 2.5 years with the conditions she seek classes while in prison to better herself.

“The state believes those conditions have been met,” she said.

The state did not oppose Jackson’s judicial release, but another condition was she be released into intensive supervised probation and undergo a mental health evaluation, Gross said.

Jackson already has been added to the Department of Developmental Disability Abuser Registry, which was another condition, Gross said.

Jackson said, while in prison, she had time to reflect on what she did and better herself.

“I just want a chance to prove myself, that I have changed,” she said.

Jackson was transferred from the Northeast Reintegration Center in Cleveland for Monday’s judicial review.