US News
Lawmakers face long to-do list, uncertain success PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 08:50
WASHINGTON (AP) — A gridlocked Congress failed to do the big things: overhauling the nation’s immigration system, reforming the loophole-cluttered tax code and stiffening background checks on gun buyers. Now it’s time to see whether it can just do the basics.
With just two weeks before lawmakers’ sacrosanct August break, progress is decidedly mixed on several must-pass items due to Capitol Hill partisanship, heightened by midterm elections and the Obama administration’s conflicting signals to Congress. Lawmakers must find about $10 billion to keep highway projects on track through next spring, ease long wait times for veterans seeking health care and deal with a humanitarian crisis of some 57,000 unaccompanied immigrant children who have entered the U.S. along t Save he Southern border since last fall.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 July 2014 08:54
Read more...
 
Report: Retaliation by supervisors common at VA PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by By MATTHEW DALY Associated Press   
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 07:25
WASHINGTON (AP) — A pharmacy supervisor at the VA was placed on leave after complaining about errors and delays in delivering medications to patients at a hospital in Palo Alto, California. In Pennsylvania, a doctor was removed from clinical work after complaining that on-call doctors were refusing to go to a VA hospital in Wilkes-Barre.
Medical professionals from coast to coast have pointed out problems at the VA, only to suffer retaliation from supervisors and other high-ranking officials, according to a report Monday by a private government watchdog.
The report compiled by the Project on Government Oversight, a group that conducts its own investigations and works with whistleblowers, is based on comments and complaints filed by nearly 800 current and former VA employees and veterans. Those comments indicate that concerns about the VA go far beyond the long waiting times or falsified appointment records that have received much recent attention, extending to the quality of health care services veterans receive, the report said.
Read more...
 
Perry sending National Guard troops to border PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by By CHRISTOPHER SHERMAN and WILL WEISSERT Associated Press   
Tuesday, 22 July 2014 07:14
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Gov. Rick Perry said Monday he is deploying up to 1,000 National Guard troops over the next month to the Texas-Mexico border to combat criminals that Republican state leaders say are exploiting a surge of children and families entering the U.S. illegally.
Perry, a vocal critic of the White House’s response to the border crisis — and who is mulling a second presidential run in 2016 — said the state has a responsibility to act after “lip service” from the federal government.
He rejected suggestions that Texas was militarizing local communities by putting National Guard troops on the ground or that crime data along the border doesn’t justify additional resources.
The deployment will cost Texas an estimated $12 million a month. Texas Adjutant General John Nichols said his troops would simply be “referring and deterring” immigrants and not detaining people — though Nichols said the National Guard could if asked.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 22 July 2014 07:19
Read more...
 
Hopkins settles pelvic exam suits for $190 million PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by By JULIET LINDERMAN Associated Press   
Monday, 21 July 2014 14:11
BALTIMORE (AP) — Johns Hopkins Hospital has agreed to a $190 million settlement with more than 8,000 patients of a gynecologist who secretly photographed and videotaped women’s bodies in the examining room with a pen-like camera he wore around his neck, lawyers said Monday.
Dr. Nikita Levy was fired in February 2013, days after an employee alerted hospital authorities about her suspicions and he was forced to turn over the camera. He committed suicide ten days later. Investigators discovered roughly 1,200 videos and 140 images stored on a series of servers in his home. “All of these women were brutalized by this,” said the women’s lead attorney, Jonathan Schochor.
Read more...
 
Anchorage mulls fence regulations to protect moose PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Monday, 21 July 2014 13:54
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — After five moose were gored to death trying to jump over some decorative fences, officials in Alaska’s largest city are considering regulations to make the gothic-style fences safer.
The Anchorage Assembly on Aug. 5 will hold a public hearing on proposed regulations for metal palisade fences that have spiked, pointed tips.
The fences stand between 4- and 6-feet tall and usually encircle private residences for both security and aesthetic reasons, the Alaska Dispatch News reported (http://is.gd/9XVteV). But state wildlife biologists say moose get caught up, or gored by the tips when they try to jump over them.
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 145

Front Page Stories

Rossford schools to put levy on fall ballot
07/22/2014 | BILL RYAN, Sentinel Staff Writer
article thumbnail

ROSSFORD - Voters in the Rossford School District will be asked to approve a new 4.49- [ ... ]


Custar man ruled not competent
07/22/2014 | PETER KUEBECK, Sentinel Staff Writer
article thumbnail

File photo. Thomas Boyer, left, is seen with his attorney. (Photo: Enoch Wu/Sentinel-Tri [ ... ]


Other Front Page Articles