Millions of parts spark functioning of senses PDF Print E-mail
Written by BILL RYAN Sentinel Religion Editor   
Friday, 11 May 2012 08:29
When most think of God, they think on a grand scale. Yet some of the greatest energy of God is in the small sensory responses within us.
Almost everything we do is connected to one or more of the five senses. Our nervous systems pick what is around us to communicate the necessary data directly to the brain and other parts of the body.
For example, we feel something is hot and instinctively pull away; we see a beautiful sight and smile; we hear a funny joke and laugh; we taste something good and want more; or we smell dinner being prepared and ready ourselves.
Each sense: hearing, sight, smell, taste and touch, detects something and communicates the information where needed.
The greatest scientists create what barely mimics many of those senses. Nothing equals the intelligent design of our creation and inner workings of those body functions.
Hearing
Our ears are designed not only for hearing, but also balance.
Sound waves constantly sweep through the air and that movement is picked up by the ear and transmitted to the brain. The auditory nerve carries messages from 25,000 receptors in your ear to your brain. Messages of danger such as a siren or messages of awe and wonder such as a newborn baby's gurgles, and endless others are important uses of God's energy within. Our balance is also regulated with the aid of fluid in the ears.
"So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ." (Romans 10:17)
Sight
Our eyes are a personal video camera recording what transpires around us to the brain for storage. A simple statement for sight, the most complex of the five senses.
The intricacy of the eye includes 150 million light-sensitive cells called rods and cones which send the image to the brain through the optic nerve. An engineer may shudder at the challenge of developing any object including that many cells.
Our eyes are a window to all of God's wonders, the beauty of creation and our opportunity to see all of his glory. Camera quality improves, yet nothing compares to the human eye.
Still, what we see is miniscule as compared to how God sees us, "Nothing in all creation is hidden from God's sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of Him to whom we must give account." (Hebrews 4:13)
Smell
Noses receive odor particles which are invisible to the human eye even with the aid of a microscope. There are millions of odor particles around us at all times. In addition to processing smells our noses filter the air as it travels to our lungs for breathing.
The olfactory nerve almost instantly gets a message and transmits the odor to the brain.
Then. the body embraces the good smells or runs from the foul ones. The brain also stores aromas and references the smells as "this or that" categories.
"For we are the aroma of Christ to God among those who are being saved and among those who are perishing, (2 Corinthians 2:15)
Taste
While primarily on our tongue, taste buds are also on the roof of our moths. There are approximately 10,000 tiny taste receptors waiting to transmit the details of what we eat to the brain. A chemical reaction, an energy force, uses saliva to break down the aspects of taste. This allows the receptor cells to alert the brain. Those tiny taste buds recognize four aspects of taste: sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. Over our lifetime, our tastes change, including the disappearance of most taste buds on the sides and roof of our mouths.
Leave it to God to locate the "sweet" taste buds right at the front of our tongue. The sweetness of God's goodness is thus prominent.
"Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in him." (Psalm 34:8)
At virtually every given second, we are using God-given energy through multi-millions of body parts to enrich and to live our lives. It is a gift we often take for granted.
(The sense of touch will be examined later.)
 

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