Inside look of the new Wolfe Center for the Arts PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Sentinel-Tribune   
Tuesday, 29 November 2011 10:18
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The lobby of the new $40 million Wolfe Center for the Arts is seen, Monday, Nov. 28, 2011, on the campus of Bowling Green State University. Two and a half years since the official start of construction, the Wolfe Center for the Arts is ready to make its debut. The $40 million center will open to the public for tours next week, Dec. 9, in conjunction with the ArtsX celebration. (Photos: JD Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune) SEE MORE PHOTOS




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Students are seen through a classroom window.
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The Donnell was designed to evoke the image of Her Majesty’s Theatre in London with a circular balcony. The house seats about 385, about 200 fewer than the Eva Marie Saint Theatre in University Hall.
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BGSU's Ron Shields inside Donnell Theater. The Donnell stage rises 77 feet with the state-of-the-art stage machinery. Underneath the stage is an elaborate support system that will allow different parts of the stage to be raised and lowered, and for trap doors to be opened making way for a visitation by the ghost of Hamlet’s father or other dramatic specters.
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BGSU's James Dachik inside dance studio, named for the late dance teacher Margit Heskett. The studio has a large window looking out over the parking lot. Those windows will present images of artists at work, either dancing or working on computers to those approaching the Wolfe from the west.
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Second floor open seating area for students.
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Second floor classroom.
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A “free-floating” grand staircase sweeps upward. One side of the staircase is stairs the other half has seating, so performances can be staged in the lobby. Above the staircase are the shimmering panels of the artwork by Anne Senstad. The 30-by-80-foot work captures the shifting tones from grey to golden reflecting the light of Northwest Ohio.
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An openness to collaboration was a key factor in selecting Snohetta as the architectural designers for the project.
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The design, Katerina Ray said, makes effective use of natural light. The decor is minimal, but elegant and integrates the natural landscape. Katerina Ray is the director of the School of Art.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 29 November 2011 11:03
 

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