Perrysburg students pack new computers PDF Print E-mail
Written by ALEX ASPACHER Sentinel Staff Writer   
Friday, 23 August 2013 10:14
PerrysburgHighSchool_rotator
PERRYSBURG - Some students are adding new computers to their arsenal of back-to-school supplies with the start of classes looming.
Those in grades 5, 8 and 9 are receiving computers for use in and out of the classroom as part of the Perrysburg's One-to-One technology program. Ninth-graders will each receive a MacBook Air, while the younger students are given Samsung Chromebooks. If all goes well, the plan is to expand the program to grades 5-12 in two years.
The program signals a paradigm shift in education, which in the past was all about memorization and recalling information.
Now, that information lies all across the Web just waiting to be looked up on a phone or tablet. Rather than learning a list of former United States presidents, students are more likely to find that information online via telephone, tablet or computer.
It now makes more sense to teach how to research information online through reliable sources, said Superintendent Tom Hosler.
"As time has evolved, the need to look at getting these devices into the kids' hands as an individual learning tool has become more of a desire and a need for educators," he said.
Details of the plan were discussed during Monday's school board meeting while board members worked from Chromebooks to gain a sense of the equipment students will soon have.
Superintendent Tom Hosler said the program is intended to better prepare students for college and careers and to prepare them for a switch to online standardized testing beginning in 2014.
Students will use their devices during school and take them home in the evening, allowing access to grades, class content and calendars of assignments and tests, as well as better communication between parents, students and teachers.
Chromebooks are less expensive and provide basic web-based functionality, while the MacBooks allow for more production and creativity for projects such as creating a multimedia presentation, Hosler said.
Cost of the computers is $563,600, around 1.5 percent of the district's operating budget. Funding was designated in the district's levy passed last November.
The same filter will be in place that restricts inappropriate or unwanted content to school computers such as those in libraries. Any Internet connection, even at home, routes itself through the district's servers to maintain content control. Even if that protection is circumvented, records of each computer's history will be maintained and students held accountable, Hosler said.
Parents will pay a $25 yearly fee for a Chromebook and $50 for a MacBook, which will be used toward maintenance and "loaner" computers to be issued by each school when a student's device stops working.
Those worried their child may be prone to lose or damage their computer are encouraged to have the item covered under their homeowner's insurance, perhaps costing around $20 per year.
If a student encounters accidental damage or another problem, technology staff will look into the problem, possibly leading to a deductible of $75 to $150 for a repair.
Last Updated on Friday, 23 August 2013 10:27
 

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