Haskins' top cop also runs village operations PDF Print E-mail
Written by PETER KUEBECK Sentinel Staff Writer   
Saturday, 10 August 2013 07:52
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Haskins Administrator and Chief of Police Colby Carroll poses next to a police vehicle Wednesday morning in Haskins. (Photo: Shane Hughes/Sentinel-Tribune)
HASKINS - Colby Carroll wears a lot of hats in his dual positions with the village, and he's loving every minute of it.
"I'm having fun," said Carroll, who serves the village as both police chief and village administrator.
Carroll served in the U.S. Army in counter-intelligence at bases in Arizona, the Presidio, Washington State and even Korea before he heard the call of law enforcement.
He was a deputy sheriff with the Defiance County Sheriff's Office from 1992 to 1996, and thereafter was a police officer with the city of Napoleon, attaining the rank of lieutenant.
He came to the village in 2009, hired simultaneously into both positions.
Carroll holds two master's degrees - one in criminal justice, the other an MBA - from Defiance College.
"When this opportunity popped up, it was unique in the offer because it was, one, something I've never done before. The law enforcement side I thought I had substantial experience. But it really excited me as far as things I hadn't been able to do before, something new to learn. I really found I put my education to use."
Carroll's office and police headquarters are located in the village hall on North Church Street. Fifty percent of his salary comes from his police chief position, and the other half from the village side.
"Balancing them on daily things is just based on priority," he said of juggling both jobs, "whatever needs to be done on a particular day."
One of the items consuming his time currently is the village's plans to build a new village hall on the site of the former Haskins Elementary School. The project is slated to cost approximately $300,000.
The police department usually receives about 600 calls for service a year. In addition to Carroll, the department has two full-time officers, and six part-time personnel, as well as a police auxiliary.
"We just try to kind of fill in as much time as possible with the staff we have," he said.
"Because of the dual roles, I'm considered part-time" as an officer.
Carroll himself responds to service calls, but has also found himself in a variety of other situations through his jobs - say, for instance, changing the batteries of an elderly resident's smoke detector, or helping to pour concrete at one of the parks. Carroll also serves as the village's IT specialist.
"We take on a lot of our own projects," he said, adding later "it's kind of just general day-to-day business."
Carroll most enjoys the fact that his jobs allow him to interact with the community.
"This is a close-knit, very friendly community," he said. "They're happy to see you, enjoy speaking with you, and generally just are pleased that we're here."
There are challenges to having two different positions too, he allowed.
"Here the most challenging is dealing with things that I haven't yet encountered, especially on the village administrator side. It's somewhat of a stretch for me being comfortable and familiar with dealing with daily law enforcement business," and then going on to larger village matters.
"So when I say challenging, I think that's in a good way."
"I've got a great support staff on both sides. It's nice - if I get pulled away and tied up on the law enforcement side of things, the staff here picks up things and helps out. I think everyone here is wearing multiple hats. They chip in and get the job done."
Carroll and his wife have four children - three sons and a daughter - and two grandchildren. His son has followed his father's footsteps into the military and is serving in the Marine Corps.
"I'm at a very pleasing place in my life," said Carroll. "You get to see your kids and how they're doing so well as adults, and my career is great."
 

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