Emotional end to the fair PDF Print E-mail
Written by BILL RYAN | Sentinel Farm Editor   
Tuesday, 06 August 2013 12:07
Heather Hugg takes down her display that she had set up for the week in the beef barn at the Wood County Fair. Monday was the last day for the week long event. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)
Heather Hugg takes down her display that she had set up for the week in the beef barn at the Wood County Fair. Monday was the last day for the week long event. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)
While much of the public focuses on the Wood County Fair's entertainment, rides, food and exhibits, for hundreds of youth the main reason for the fair is housed in the barns, just off the midway.

The closing day of the fair features the Junior Fair Livestock Sale, when the youth are rewarded for their efforts in raising and caring for the animals through the premiums offered by willing bidders. Richard King, fair manager said Monday's sale raised $215,281. Though not a record, he characterized it as a "good year."

On Monday three poignant stories arose during the sale.

One of those stories involves 12-year-old Maddie Recker, who raised money from the sale of her dairy beef feeder to be donated to the Appelhans family following the death of the mother, Trish. She raised $9,000. (See related story.)

The second story involved a memorial donation of $2,600 from the sale of the goat of Devon Patrick Gray, of Grand Rapids.

The 15-year-old Otsego freshman died April 21 as the result of an ATV accident. The fair board approved a family member to show his goat for the youth who was a a member of the Beaver Creek Boosters 4-H Club and the Otsego FFA. His brother, Benjamin Gray, showed Devon's goat in memory of his brother.

Buyers gather for annual livestock aution at the Wood County Fair. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)
Buyers gather for annual livestock aution at the Wood County Fair. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)

The proceeds of the sale will be donated toward a fund for use for improvements to the goat barn at the fairgrounds.

He was the son of John and Jane (Jankowski) Gray. A memorial brick has been approved for installation to memorialize the young man.

Many youth wore shirts throughout the week in remembrance of the talented and well-liked young man.

Adam Canterbury was not on hand to show his market lamb, either, but for a far different reason. The sophomore at Otsego High School left on Saturday for his fourth consecutive year to attend the Naval Sea Cadet Corps military camp at Camp McCrady in South Carolina.

According to his mother, Shannon Canterbury, this is the fourth year for him to attend the camp. This year the Petty Officer, third class, is in Field Ops training as well as Night Operations and Survival training. He will be sleeping in hammocks set out in remote areas.

Andrew McEwen, 10, waits patiently to step in to the ring to have his hog auctioned off during the annual livestock aution at the Wood County Fair. Monday was the last day of the week long fair. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)
Andrew McEwen, 10, waits patiently to step in to the ring to have his hog auctioned off during the annual livestock aution at the Wood County Fair. Monday was the last day of the week long fair. (Photo: J.D. Pooley/Sentinel-Tribune)

"It's pretty hard core for kids, but he loves every minute of it," Shannon Canterbury said.

She said the six-year member of Tontogany Four Leaf Clovers member has shown lambs for several years.

His lamb was purchased for $650 by a trio of buyers including his grandparents, Jim and Roxanne Jones, Barnhisel Surveying and Kathrens Insurance.

His younger brother, Andrew, stood in for him at the sale.

Mom said after the sale that Andrew told her, "He should give be half of it for standing in for me."

Andrew received a $400 premium on his own for his market hog.

One of the many volunteer auctioneers, Steve Powell, said, "This sale has gone very well."

A final total was not available as of press time this morning; however, many experts were amazed at the premiums offered for the youth.

"I bet this will be a record sale. The kids will really benefit from this," said Jamie Belleville of Belleville Meat Market.

Each and every youth at the sale works very hard in preparation and the sale day is the closing moment for their Junior Fair projects.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 August 2013 15:30
 

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