Financial
U.S. government ceding control of key Internet body PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer   
Saturday, 15 March 2014 05:14

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The U.S. government is relinquishing its control of the Internet's address system in a shift that may raise questions about the future direction of online innovation and communications.

The decision announced Friday begins a long-planned transition affecting the stewardship of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN. That's a not-for-profit agency launched in 1998 by the Commerce Department to govern the system that assigns website addresses and directs Internet traffic.

The department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration, or NTIA, hopes to end its oversight of ICANN's Internet Assigned Numbers Authority by the time its contract expires in September 2015. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority administers the technology that keeps computers connected to the Web and steers Internet traffic.

Proposals for a new ICANN stewardship will be accepted beginning next week at a conference in Singapore.

Read more...
 
Detroit to monitor Marathon's hiring practices PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by Associated Press   
Friday, 14 March 2014 10:16

DETROIT (AP) — Detroit officials plan to monitor Marathon Petroleum's hiring practices more closely to ensure that the company is making an effort to hire city residents, officials said.

Marathon got a $175 million tax break from the City of Detroit for a $2.2 billion expansion project at its refinery in southeast Detroit. The personal property tax abatement was awarded after Marathon in 2007 appealed to City Council, pledging to recruit Detroiters for new jobs.

"In a city with double-digit unemployment, any company that's receiving a tax abatement of nearly $180 million should be giving more back, including hiring residents," Councilwoman Saunteel Jenkins said.

Marathon employs 514 full-time workers at its refinery, and 30 workers are listed as Detroit residents as of January, the Detroit Free Press reported (http://on.freep.com/1gw2yuY ). In 2007, when the city approved the tax abatement, the refinery employed about 320 people, 15 of whom were Detroit residents.

Read more...
 
Rule targets for-profit colleges over student debt PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by PHILIP ELLIOTT, Associated Press   
Friday, 14 March 2014 10:30

WASHINGTON (AP) — The for-profit college industry says it will vigorously oppose proposed regulations by the Obama administration designed to protect students at for-profit colleges from amassing huge debt they can't pay off.

The proposed regulations would penalize career training programs that produce graduates without the training needed to find a job with a salary that will allow them to pay off their debt. Schools, for-profit or not, that don't comply would lose access to the federal student aid programs.

"Career-training programs offer millions of Americans an opportunity they desperately need to further their education and reach the middle class," Education Secretary Arne Duncan told reporters Thursday. "Today, too many of these programs fail to provide students with the training that they need at taxpayers' expense and the cost to these students' futures."

If finalized, the regulations would take effect in 2016.

Read more...
 
FBI balks at pot background checks PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Written by GENE JOHNSON, Associated Press   
Friday, 14 March 2014 10:15

SEATTLE (AP) — The FBI is refusing to run nationwide background checks on people applying to run legal marijuana businesses in Washington state, even though it has conducted similar checks in Colorado — a discrepancy that illustrates the quandary the Justice Department faces as it allows the states to experiment with regulating a drug that's long been illegal under federal law.

Washington state has been asking for nearly a year if the FBI would conduct background checks on its applicants, to no avail. The bureau's refusal raises the possibility that people with troublesome criminal histories could wind up with pot licenses in the state — undermining the department's own priorities in ensuring that states keep a tight rein on the nascent industry.

It's a strange jam for the feds, who announced last summer that they wouldn't sue to prevent Washington and Colorado from regulating marijuana after 75 years of prohibition.

The Obama administration has said it wants the states to make sure pot revenue doesn't go to organized crime and that state marijuana industries don't become a cover for the trafficking of other illegal drugs. At the same time, it might be tough for the FBI to stomach conducting such background checks — essentially helping the states violate federal law.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Next > End >>

Page 66 of 220